Environmental Studies Courses
Summer and Fall 2010

Summer 2010

RELG 2430.07 Environment and Religion: Ecology and Spirituality
Instructor: George Billings
W 5:30-9:30 (Westport)

This course will explore the spirituality of ecology from multi dimensional and historical perspectives. This includes examining creation themes in several tribal religions; reviewing eastern and western ecological traditions and critically assessing environmental issues in conflict. Students can expect to deepen their awareness of their relationship to creation and how to be responsible stewards of and co-creators in an evolving universe. An Environmental Studies Course. [VAL]

BIOL 1318 02 Issues in Biology: Aquatic Environments and BIOL 1318.03 Issues in Biology: Aquatic Environments Lab (4 credits total)
Instructor: Jeff DePew
TR 9:00-11:50

This course is an in depth study and experiential exploration of various freshwater aquatic habitats, as well as the interdisciplinary stories, myths and literature that are associated with each ecosystem. Pond, wetland, stream, marsh, river and basin – each habitat is explored, studied and experienced. Included are water chemistry, EPA standardized water testing, sampling and evaluating of aquatic invertebrates; analysis of water, watershed and ecosystem health; reporting our findings to private and state agencies – these are all vital and important parts of this course. Interdisciplinary readings accompany each specific exploration and habitat. Students will be certified in Missouri Stream Team standards at the end of the course and will be able to start their own Stream Team. There will be multiple field trips to local and regional streams, rivers and watersheds. Lab required. Taken concurrently. May be repeated for credit if content differs. (SCI)

Fall 2010

ANSO 1090.01 Introduction to Geography: World and Regional (3 credits)
Instructor: Mikels Skele
MWF 1:00-1:50 am

This is a teacher certification course. It will be an exploration of most areas of geography: land-human relationships, regions, spacial interaction, population, resources and socioeconomic development. Students will look at geography in a changing world, doing so from the perspective of future teachers in elementary and secondary classrooms. International Studies [CUL, HST]

BIOL 1020.01 and BIOL 1021.01: Biology of Animals and Lab (4 credits total)
Instructor: Jeff DePew
TR 12:00-1:20 (BIOL 1020) and F 1:30-4:20 pm (1021)

Introduces the fascinating world of animals, from the tiny water flea to the elephant. Examines the challenges in their lives and the ways they meet them, including the search for food sources and shelter, reproduction, and internal stability. Laboratory (1021) required. BIOL 1020 and BIOL 1021 must be taken concurrently. Intended for non-majors. (SCI)

BIOL 1318.01 Issues in Biology: Stream Ecology and BIOL 1318.02 Issues in Biology: Stream Ecology Lab (4 credits total)
Instructor: Jeff DePew
M 1:00-3:50 and W 1:00-3:50

ETHICS 1000.03 Issues and Problems in Ethics: Ethics and Climate Change
Instructor: David Pollack
F 1:00-1:50

Do you have a future? Within the lifetime of undergraduates, Climate Change is likely to become the most pressing problem facing humanity. With Al Gore's "An Inconvenient Truth" as a starting point, this course will analyze whether the catastrophic consequences of Climate Change can be avoided. Students will be empowered to develop their own approach to handling Climate Change. May be repeated two times, total three credits. [VAL] A Practical and Interdisciplinary Ethics Course.

GNST 1308.01 Technology, Science, and Society: When Rivers Run Wild (3 credits)
Instructor: David Wilson
Fall I M 5:30-9:30 pm

Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans, Mississippi River floods, or flash floods on local streams—are they natural disasters or the result of human actions? What is pollution and what can society do about it? Students will use a variety of disciplines to inform the way they think about water, storms, rivers, floods and our social values. [SCI]

JOUR 2350 01 Outdoor/Nature Journalism
Instructor: Don Corrigan
MWF 11:00-11:50

This course provides aspiring journalists and writers on climate with the tools necessary to report on climatology and on natural phenomena that sometimes results in disaster for flora, fauna - and humans. Students will have a choice of writing journalistic articles and advocacy papers on the handling of past weather disasters, safety issues, response issues and the future of emergency management both from a state and national perspective. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing, JOUR 1030 or permission of instructor.

POLT 2500.01 Interdisciplinary Approach to Politics: Political Economy - Sex, Drugs & Garbage
Instructor: Allan MacNeill
T 5:30-9:30 Fall I

Are government regulations, prohibitions and mandates the best policies for dealing with prostitution, illegal drugs and garbage? Should policy-makers consider the cost effectiveness of their actions, or should moral concerns outweigh economic considerations? What role, if any, should market forces play in addressing these issues? What is the relationship between individual freedom and social welfare? This course will explore diverse viewpoints on these questions from within the field of political economy. Different theoretical approaches will be applied to three case studies: the economics of the sex industry, the legalization of drugs, and public recycling programs. The course format will include lecture, videos, discussion and debates. Students will be evaluated based on short written assignments, class participation and a final exam. An American Studies Course.[VAL] Integrates the contributions of other disciplines--history, psychology, sociology, economics, literature, media, philosophy--into the study of politics and the role politics plays in the nongovernmental arena. May be repeated for credit if content differs.

RELG 2430 Environment and Religion: Ecology and Spirituality

Section G1
Instructor: George Billings
Fall I M 5:30-9:30 (Winghaven)

Section W2
Instructor P. O'Leary
Fall II (Online)

This course will explore the spirituality of ecology from multi dimensional and historical perspectives. This includes examining creation themes in several tribal religions; reviewing eastern and western ecological traditions and critically assessing environmental issues in conflict. Students can expect to deepen their awareness of their relationship to creation and how to be responsible stewards of and co-creators in an evolving universe. [VAL]

RELG 4400.01 Spiritual Paths and Classics: Nature Spirituality and Activism
Instructor: Chris Parr
Fall I T 5:30-9:30

SCIN 1010.06 Topics in Physical Science: Natural Disasters (3 credits)
Instructor: Moats, Mark            
Fall II, M 5:30-9:30 pm (Downtown)

This is a survey of the various natural disasters and their causes. We will explore their relationship to Earth processes and the long term risks to human populations. We will also examine how scientists determine the causes, effects, and prediction of catastrophes. May be repeated if content differs. (SCI)