Environmental Studies Courses
Summer and Fall 2011

Summer 2011

RELG 2430.07 Environment and Religion: Ecology and Spirituality
Instructor: George Billings
W 5:30-9:30 (Westport)

This course will explore the spirituality of ecology from multi dimensional and historical perspectives. This includes examining creation themes in several tribal religions; reviewing eastern and western ecological traditions and critically assessing environmental issues in conflict. Students can expect to deepen their awareness of their relationship to creation and how to be responsible stewards of and co-creators in an evolving universe. An Environmental Studies Course. [VAL]

BIOL 1318.01 Issues in Biology: Aquatic Environments and BIOL 1318.02 Issues in Biology: Aquatic Environments Lab (4 credits total)
Instructor: Jeff DePew
TR 9:00-11:50

This course is an in depth study and experiential exploration of various freshwater aquatic habitats, as well as the interdisciplinary stories, myths and literature that are associated with each ecosystem. Pond, wetland, stream, marsh, river and basin – each habitat is explored, studied and experienced. Included are water chemistry, EPA standardized water testing, sampling and evaluating of aquatic invertebrates; analysis of water, watershed and ecosystem health; reporting our findings to private and state agencies – these are all vital and important parts of this course. Interdisciplinary readings accompany each specific exploration and habitat. Students will be certified in Missouri Stream Team standards at the end of the course and will be able to start their own Stream Team. There will be multiple field trips to local and regional streams, rivers and watersheds. Lab required. Taken concurrently. May be repeated for credit if content differs. (SCI)

Fall 2011

ANTH 1400 01 Introduction to Geography: World and Regional (3 credits)
Instructor: Mikels Skele
MWF 1:00-1:50

Acquaints the student with contemporary and classic issues in geography. Offerings range from the study of demography to the evolution of humanity and culture. Intended for majors and non-majors, including students in teacher education programs. [HST, CUL]

ANTH 3360 01 Indigenous Peoples, Culture and Globalization
Instructor: Don Conway-Long
MW 1:00-2:20

BIOL 1020.01 and BIOL 1021.01: Biology of Animals and Lab (4 credits total)
Instructor: Jeff DePew
TR 12:00-1:20 (BIOL 1020) and F 1:30-4:20 pm (1021)

Introduces the fascinating world of animals, from the tiny water flea to the elephant. Examines the challenges in their lives and the ways they meet them, including the search for food sources and shelter, reproduction, and internal stability. Laboratory (1021) required. BIOL 1020 and BIOL 1021 must be taken concurrently. Intended for non-majors. (SCI)

ECON 3700 10 Economics of Development
Instructor:
MW 2:30-3:50

ENGL 3500 01 Contexts: Nature's Nation
Instructor: Karla Armbruster
MWF 11:00-11:50

At the end of The Great Gatsby, the narrator (Nick Carraway) looks out over the Sound and imagines what the Dutch sailors who first colonized New York must have seen: “a fresh, green breast of the new world . . . [that] pandered in whispers to the last and greatest of all human dreams”: that here, in the New World, they had found a place that could actually live up to the human capacity for wonder and ambition. In other words, Nick is suggesting that the American dream that Gatsby pursued originally sprang from the European encounter with the unspoiled, unknown nature of the continent itself.

In this lyrical conclusion, Fitzgerald captures a long and diverse tradition in American culture and literature — turning to the natural world as a source of identity, whether on the level of the nation, community, or individual. In this course, we will explore some of the key works in this tradition, including Thoreau’s Walden, Melville’s Moby-Dick, Sarah Orne Jewett’s The Country of the Pointed Firs, William Faulkner’s “The Bear,” Edward Abbey’s Desert Solitaire, Annie Dillard’s Pilgrim at Tinker Creek and Leslie Silko’s Ceremony.

GNST 1300 01Technology, Science and Society: Introduction to Environmental Studies
Instructor: Karla Armbruster
TR 1:30-2:50

Learning more about the environmental challenges facing us in the 21st century can seem overwhelming and depressing. However, there's another way to look at it: college students today have an unprecedented opportunity to help us make the transition to a more sustainable, healthier, and happier way of life by taking creative, socially just approaches to problems like global climate change, reliance on fossil fuels, and human population growth.

This course will introduce you to the multidisciplinary field of environmental studies and the ways it can help us understand and solve environmental problems. In order to enable you to understand the scientific, social, and humanistic aspects of these problems, their causes, and their possible solutions, we will
- cover basic ecological concepts and develop the ability to think in terms of interconnected systems,
- explore our own environmental identities (personal/cultural connections to nature and environment and the ways they have affected who we are),
- use a multi-disciplinary approach to investigate the environmental implications of food, water, and air - three aspects of the environment that deeply affect us all, and
- hear stories of success and hope.

Along the way, we will learn about a range of cultural/spiritual perspectives on nature and the environment; the history of the environmental movement; genetic engineering of food; global climate change; the privatization of water; and issues of environmental justice. The course will include guest speakers and field trips.

JOUR 2750 01 Reporting Disaster Stories
Instructor: Don Corrigan
MW 11:00-11:50

Whether it’s the epic 1993 Mississippi Flood, the 2005 Katrina Hurricane, or the 2010 New Year’s Eve tornado outbreak in Missouri, disasters put special demands on journalists as they attempt to cover these tragic events. This course examines disaster journalism covering more than a century, and also scrutinizes the way reporters cover traumatic events today. Students will learn how to write disaster stories using local, state and federal resources, as well as analyzing current emergency and relief agencies in disaster coverage. The course will also take a look at claims that climate change portends more weather disasters in our future.

RELG 2430 W1 Environment and Religion: Ecology and Spirituality
Instructor: Magency
Fall I Online

This course will explore the spirituality of ecology from multi dimensional and historical perspectives. This includes examining creation themes in several tribal religions; reviewing eastern and western ecological traditions and critically assessing environmental issues in conflict. Students can expect to deepen their awareness of their relationship to creation and how to be responsible stewards of and co-creators in an evolving universe. [VAL]

SCIN 1010.06 Topics in Physical Science: Natural Disasters (3 credits)
Instructor: Moats, Mark            
Fall II, M 5:30-9:30 pm (Downtown)

This is a survey of the various natural disasters and their causes. We will explore their relationship to Earth processes and the long term risks to human populations. We will also examine how scientists determine the causes, effects, and prediction of catastrophes. May be repeated if content differs. (SCI)