ROUTE 66 RAN THROUGH DOGTOWN

Guest Essay By James Powell
May 5, 2002

James Powell is founder of the Route 66 Association of Missouri
The Dogtown Historical Society is very appreciative of this contribution to the history of our neighborhood.

U.S. HIGHWAY 66 WENT THROUGH DOGTOWN? IT SURE DID! FROM NOVEMBER 11, 1926 TO AUGUST 5, 1933, OLD ROUTE 66 - AMERICA'S MOST FAMOUS HIGHWAY - MADE ITS WAY THROUGH DOGTOWN AS IT HEADED WEST TO CALIFORNIA. WHERE DID IT GO IN DOGTOWN - TWO PRIMARY ROUTES, AS FOLLOWS:

  1. "Entering St. Louis: At end of [McKinley] bridge L on 9th St.; next R on Salisbury St. 6; R on Natural Bridge Ave. .3; L on Grand Blvd. 1.4; R on Delmar Blvd. .6; L on Sarah St. To Joplin: From Sarah St. go west on Lindell Blvd. .3; L on Boyle Ave. .6; R on Clayton Ave. thru Forest Park 2.7; L on McCausland Ave. 1.1; R on Manchester Rd." and,

  2. "at end of [McKinley] bridge L on 9th St.; next R on Salisbury St. .6; R on Natural Bridge Ave. .3; L on Grand Blvd. 1.4; R on Delmar Blvd. .6; L on Sarah St. .1; R on Washington St. .1; L on Whittier St. To Joplin: From Sarah (sic) St. go west on Lindell Blvd. 3.0; L on Skinker Rd. l.0; ahead on McCausland Ave. 1.1; R on Manchester Rd."

Here's the whole story, as told by Jim Powell, founder of the route 66 Association of Missouri

A BRIEF HISTORY OF U.S. HIGHWAY 66

Route 66 was never an ordinary road. On February 4, 1927, the U.S. 66 Highway Association was formed in Tulsa, OK, and the road's lifetime name -- "The Main Street of America" -- was born. It was known over the years by many other names, such as "The Way West", "The Will Rogers Highway" and "The Mother Road." It came to be known as the most magical road in all the world. Even architect Frank Lloyd Wright once emarked, "Route 66 is a giant chute down which everything loose in this country is sliding into southern California."

Route 66 was commissioned on November 11, 1926, and was originally 2,448 miles from Chicago to Los Angeles. (The longest recorded length was 2,499 miles in 1929.) On June 17, 1935, it was extended from downtown Los Angeles to its famous termination point with Alt. U.S. 101, overlooking the Pacific Ocean in Santa Monica. On the same date, 66 was rerouted over the Chain of Rocks Bridge in north St. Louis. And on September 26, 1937, it was rerouted directly west from Santa Rosa to Albuquerque, NM, bypassing Santa Fe.

As we think about Route 66, one might remember the "First Annual International -Trans-Continental Foot Race", or the "Bunion Derby" as it came to be known. The race started in Los Angeles on March 4, 1928, and covered the entire length of 66 to Chicago, and then went on to New York.

The race, and the first prize of $25,000, was won by Andy Payne, a 20 year-old from Claremore, Oklahoma - a Route 66 town and the stomping ground of Will Rogers. (On June 22, 1952, the old Chain of Rocks Bridge in north St. Louis was the first of eight stops dedicating U.S. 66 as the Will Rogers Highway, as part of a cross-country promotional tour for the movie "The Story of Will Rogers".)

And, who can ever forget John Steinbeck's 1939 novel and 1940 movie, "The Grapes of Wrath", which chronicles the forced westward migration of the "Okies" from their bank-foreclosed farms through the eyes of the Joad family.

Or Bobby Troup's 1946 hit, "Get Your Kicks on Route 66" (don't forget Winona), and the 1946 book by Jack Rittenhouse, "A Guide Book to Highway 66" which mile-by-mile describes gas stations, diners and places to see. Then, in the early 60s, another generation learned about Route 66 when Buz and Tod spent 116 TV episodes traveling America in their Corvette.

Route 66 became a destination unto itself. With its caverns and caves, scenic mountains, beautiful canyons and sparkling deserts being heavily promoted by the U.S. 66 Highway Association, Route 66 became the ultimate road trip. This spawned trading posts, alligator farms, full-service gas stations, grills with fried chicken, "blue plate specials" and home-made pie, "mom and pop" motor courts, Native American festivals and every other type of tourist trap known to man.

Unfortunately, with the advent of the interstate system, Route 66 became a victim of its own success. The road was decommissioned piecemeal by the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) as interstate construction progressed.

And then 66 was completely decertified - the last 1,162 miles - on June 27, 1985. This followed the by-passing of the last section of old 66 - 5.7 miles through Williams, Arizona - when I-40 was completed on October 13, 1984. The route was "replaced" by Interstates 55, 44, 40, 15 and 10. As a side note, in December 1962, Missouri petitioned AASHTO, on behalf of all the Route 66 states, to have the interstates renumbered as I-66 from Chicago to Los Angeles. The request was refused.

Route 66, however, like a stubborn maverick, refused to die. The old road is still with us today, and now is the time for another generation to learn about and experience this great highway. To spearhead this effort, Route 66 Associations have been established and are active in all 8 Route 66 states, with a stated mission "to preserve, promote and develop old Route 66 - "The Main Street of America".

In Missouri, the state Association can be contacted as follows:

Route 66 Association of Missouri
P. O. Box 8117
St. Louis, MO 63156-8117

Members receive a membership certificate, card and decal, Missouri Route 66 map and driving guide, and the quarterly news magazine - "Show Me Route 66". The Association is a qualified non-profit Missouri corporation, and dues are tax-deductible to the extent allowed by law.

U.S. 66 BACKGROUND

When the U.S. Numbered Highway System was formally approved on November 11, 1926, substantial portions of the designated path of U.S. 66 had not been constructed and/or paved. (1) This was particularly true in the St. Louis area, where the approved route would not be complete until August 1933.

As a result, Manchester Road, which was designated to carry U.S. 50, was also used as the original path of U.S. 66 out of St. Louis since, at the time, it was the only improved road heading west out of St. Louis with no river crossings. (U.S. 50 and 66 signs were posted on Manchester by the end of October 1926.) (2)

The original map of the "United States System of Highways", adopted by AASHTO and approved by the U.S. Department of Agriculture as of November 11, 1926, shows the approved routes of U.S. 50 (Manchester Road) and U.S. 66 out of St. Louis. On this map, U.S. 66 follows its intended path through Pacific. (3)(4)(5)(6)

Also, the April 1927, issue of American Highways, which was the first time the U.S. Highway System was published by AASHTO for the general public, shows the following routings for U.S. 50 and U.S. 66 in Missouri (emphasis added):

"U.S. 50 - Beginning at the Illinois-Missouri State line at St. Louis via Grays [sic] Summit, Union, Drake, Mt. Sterling, Linn, Jefferson City, California, Sedalia, Knobnoster, Warrensburg, Lees Summit to the Missouri-Kansas State line at Kansas City.

"U.S. 66 - Beginning at the Illinois-Missouri State line at St. Louis via Pacific, Cuba, Rolla, Lebanon, Springfield, Carthage, Joplin to the Missouri-Kansas State line at Galena." (7)

The American Automobile Association (AAA) seemed to recognize that U.S. 50 was the primary route on Manchester Road, as shown by the 1927 Tour Books:

ST. LOUIS -- JOPLIN, Mo.
U.S. Route Numbers
No. 50 St. Louis-Grays [sic] Summit
No. 66 Grays [sic] Summit-Joplin
193 miles paved, balance gravel.
Thru a rolling farming country. (8)

Further, at least as early as 1927, the road through Pacific was included in the state highway plan, and by 1929, work was started in St. Louis County on "new" Watson Road as the routing of U.S. 66 in St. Louis. (9) (10) On February 17, 1927, even the old Ozark Trails Association chimed-in with a letter supporting the construction of a new U.S. 66 from downtown St. Louis through Pacific. (11) Construction was complete in mid-1933, and U.S. 66 was relocated to "new" Watson as of August 5-6, 1933. (12) U.S. 50 remained on Manchester until 1955; at this time, U.S. 50 was also relocated to Watson. (10)

Politics, of course, entered into the decision to build "new" Watson Road. But the issue was not where the highway would go. Instead, it was how the road would be funded and, if funded, when it would be built.

In 1927-1928, there were basically three separate camps with regard to how to fund the state road building. One faction wanted a pay-as-you-go program, a second wanted a $60,000,000 state road bond amendment, and a third - led by the Automobile Club of Missouri - wanted a $120,000,000 bond amendment.

Finally, a compromise was reached for a bond amendment of $75,000,000, which was approved by the voters as Proposition 3 on November 6, 1928. The amendment added 300 miles of roads to the primary system, and separately provided $11,500,000 for previously designated "traffic relief" roads in Kansas City and St. Louis, including "A road leaving U.S. 50 and U.S. 66 at or near Grays Summit, thence into St. Louis over the Antire and Watson Roads." (13)

Also, the Executive Committee of AASHTO approves all changes in the "United States Numbered Routes". There is no mention in the committee minutes for 1927-1934 of the relocation of U.S. 66 from Manchester to Watson. This is because the "new" Watson Road location of U.S. 66 was approved as part of the original numbered highway system. (14)

It seems fairly clear, therefore, that the intent of the highway officials was always to route U.S. 66 through Pacific, and Manchester Road was a temporary route until the designated route was complete.

U.S. 66 ROUTINGS IN DOGTOWN

With that background, let's delve into the path of U.S. 66 through Dogtown. In the following sections, U.S. 66 refers to the "regular, main or primary" routing, while other routes are preceded by a descriptive prefix. Also, all routings are "westbound" except where noted. [Updated or clarifying information in brackets is added by the author.]

ORIGINAL ROUTE,

U.S. 66

1926. The highway that was then marked as U.S. 60, was routed by the AAA (1926 North Central Tour Book) across the McKinley Bridge over the Mississippi River as follows:

"Entering St. Louis: At end of st. [Broadway] L on Main St. .2; R across McKinley Bridge 1.2; L on 9th St. 2.4; R on Washington Ave. .2; L on 12th St.
"To Joplin: From 12th St. go west on Locust Blvd. and Lindell Blvd. to end; L on Skinker Rd. 1 mi.; R on Clayton Rd. 4.6; L on Denny Rd. [Lindbergh Blvd.] 2 mi.; R on Manchester Rd."

1927. According to the AAA (1927 North Central and South Central Tour Books), U.S. 66 approached and went through St. Louis, as follows:

Edwardsville -- "To St. Louis: R on Hillsboro St., L on Main St., R around Court House 0.2, R on St. Louis St. 0.3, L" [on West St. under the railroad tracks into St. Louis Road, R on Chain of Rocks Road to Mitchell. From Mitchell take Nameoki Road (now SR 203) to Granite City.]

Granite City -- "To St. Louis: R on Madison Ave., R on 30th St., next L on G St. (now Grand Ave. which is one-way northbound at 27th; go west one block to State.), R on 18th St., next L on State St." [curve L and then R onto Broadway through Madison to Venice.] (15)

Venice -- "To St. Louis: at end of [Broadway] street L on Main St. 0.2, R across McKinley Bridge. (A small section of old Broadway is now blocked in both directions -- follow the signs to the bridge.) (16)

St. Louis -- "Entering St. Louis: At end of [McKinley] bridge L on 9th St.; next R on Salisbury St. .6; R on Natural Bridge Ave. .3; L on Grand Blvd. 1.4; R on Delmar Blvd. .6; L on Sarah St. To Joplin: From Sarah St. go west on Lindell Blvd. .3; L on Boyle Ave. .6; R on Clayton Ave. thru Forest Park 2.7; L on McCausland Ave. 1.1; R on Manchester Rd."

1928. The AAA (1928 South Central Tour Book) listed the routing as:

>The same as 1927 from Edwardsville to the McKinley Bridge, then "at end of [McKinley] bridge L on 9th St.; next R on Salisbury St. .6; R on Natural Bridge Ave. .3; L on Grand Blvd. 1.4; R on Delmar Blvd. .6; L on Sarah St. .1; R on Washington St. .1; L on Whittier St. To Joplin: >From Sarah (sic) St. go west on Lindell Blvd. 3.0; L on Skinker Rd. l.0; ahead on McCausland Ave. 1.1; R on Manchester Rd."

A McKinley Bridge Auto Trails Map from this period describes the eastbound routing as:

"Approaching St. Louis from the Southwest on Highways No. 50-66 (formerly Mo. Highways No. 12-14) known as the Jefferson City and Springfield-Joplin routes, go east on Manchester Road through Maplewood to McCausland Ave., left on McCausland (West end of Forest Park) to Lindell Blvd. (North side Forest Park) right on Lindell to Sarah St. (4100 block) left on Sarah to Delmar Blvd. (700 block), right on Delmar to Grand Ave. (3600 block), left on Grand to Natural Bridge Ave. (3700 block North), right on Natural Bridge to Salisbury street, left on Salisbury street to 9th street approach of McKinley Bridge."

There has long been a debate about whether U.S. 66 first crossed the McKinley Bridge, and then switched to the Municipal "Free" Bridge. Well, let's look at the record.

In 1926-1928, a 1.67 mile section of Illinois Routes 3 and 4 [U.S. 66] did not exist between the City of Madison, IL (McKinley Bridge) and the Madison County Line toward East St. Louis (Municipal Bridge), because Madison County had not obtained the right-of-way. Most likely, this road to the Municipal Bridge was the designated path of U.S. 66; however, it was impossible to use due to the 1.67 mile gap. (17) (18)

On June 26, 1926, the Illinois Department of Highways awarded the contract for this section of work, with a provision that "the right of way had not as yet been secured but would be secured on behalf of the Department, and that the contractor should not start work until the right of way had been secured and notice to proceed had been given." (17) By late 1927, Madison County had still not obtained the right of way, as lamented in two St. Louis Globe-Democrat articles dated November 1 and December 4, 1927. (19)

The Illinois Highway Department was so upset that in a letter to Madison County dated November 2, 1927, they said that "We do not contemplate the awarding of any further contracts in Madison County until such time as the right of way for the connections on Routes 3 and 4 from the City of Madison to the south line of Madison County is secured..." (17)

On December 12, 1927, the Madison County Board of Supervisors received a committee report on the efforts to obtain the nine tracts necessary to build the road, and on January 17, 1928, the County Board authorized condemnation proceedings on the five tracts that could not otherwise be obtained. The Globe-Democrat reported that an agreement was reached on March 15, 1928, to acquire the five tracts. (20)

On July 3, 1928, the Globe-Democrat reported that: "The last tract of land necessary for the construction of a hard road between Madison, Ill., and East St. Louis was acquired yesterday in a friendly condemnation suit in the Madison County Circuit Court. The strip acquired is one and a fourth miles long. Completion of this road will form a connection with the National Trail [Illinois Route 11/U.S. 40] at East St. Louis and with routes Nos. 3 and 4 at Madison, Ill."

The paving was complete on December 17, 1928, all construction was complete by mid-1929, and final inspection and acceptance by the state took place on September 13, 1929. (The road would have been opened to traffic after the paving was complete.) The final cost of the project was $46,501. (21)

Also, keep in mind that, in the early days of the U.S. Numbered Highway System, the route markers in St. Louis were placed by the Automobile Club of Missouri. It is interesting to note, therefore, that all four U.S. Highways passing through St. Louis in the 1920s (U.S. 40, 50, 61 and 66) were routed directly past the then Automobile Club of Missouri Headquarters at 4228 Lindell Blvd. (22)

1929-1932. About January 1, 1929, U.S. 66 shifted to the Municipal "Free" Bridge. That routing, as shown in about 1930 by the Automobile Club of Southern California, was:

Edwardsville -- To St. Louis: R on Vandalia St. into St. Louis St., L on West St. under the railroad tracks into St. Louis Road, R on Chain of Rocks Road to Mitchell. From Mitchell on Nameoki Road to Granite City.

Granite City -- To St. Louis: R on Madison Ave., into Broadway, L on 4th St. in Venice (State Route 3), R on Madison St., L on 2nd St. into St. Clair Ave., R on 9th St., L on Missouri Ave. and R on 10th St. to the entrance to the bridge at Piggott Ave. . (Note: the AAA 1930 Tour Book shows: To St. Louis: R on Madison Ave., R on 30th St., next L on Grand Ave., R on Niedringhaus Ave., next L on State St. then curve L and R onto Broadway through Madison to Venice.)

St. Louis -- At end of bridge, L on 7th St., R on Chouteau Ave., angle L onto Manchester Rd., R on Boyle Ave., L on Clayton Ave. through Forest Park, L on McCausland Ave., R on Manchester Rd.

This routing was substantially the same until the end of 1932. The only change was a slight rerouting in 1932 (according to the Automobile Club of Southern California, and the Hobbs Guide and Service Directory) onto Oakland Ave. (i.e., ...Clayton Ave. onto Oakland Ave., L on McCausland...).

Optional 66

A McKinley Bridge Auto Trails Map from the late 1920s describes an eastbound routing through St. Louis as follows (emphasis added):

"Approaching St. Louis from the Southwest on Highways No. 50-66 known as the Jefferson City and Springfield-Joplin routes, go east on Manchester Road through Maplewood to McCausland Ave., (7000 block) then straight ahead on McCausland Ave. to Clayton Ave. (first road to right at S-W corner of Forest Park).

"Follow signs of U.S. 50-66 on Clayton Ave. to Boyle Ave. (4300 block) leave U.S. Route 50-66 here but go straight ahead on Boyle three blocks to Vandeventer Ave (3900 block); turn left into Vandeventer Ave., go two blocks to Forest Park Ave. (200 block) then east to Grand Ave. (3600 block); then left into Grand Ave. to Natural Bridge Ave. (3700 block North), right on Natural Bridge to Salisbury street, left on Salisbury street to 9th street approach of McKinley Bridge."

1929. The McKinley Bridge routing became Optional 66 in July 1929. (Optional 66 is just another name for Alternate 66; this term was apparently preferred by the AAA and McKinley Bridge.) Optional 66 remained as the preferred route until the mid-1930s, as described later in this report.

Vol. 1--No. 1 of the Missouri Motor News, published by the Automobile Club of Missouri in July 1929, heralded the establishment of Optional 66, as follows:

NEW U.S. 66 BEST MARKED ROUTE, OPEN
Auto Club Establishes Optional Route in St. Louis.

"Making it one of the best marked highways passing through a metropolitan area, U.S. Highway 66 Optional route has been completed through St. Louis by the Sign Posting Department of The Automobile Club of Missouri.

"Through travel over the new optional route which is restricted in part to keep off heavy commercial vehicles, has been saving 4 miles distance in going through St. Louis and avoiding several railroad grade crossings in East St. Louis.

"Approximately 300 new 'Optional U.S. 66' signs were used in the marking and they are placed at least one in each block facing in each direction for the entire distance of the route. New reflecting glass signs are used at all turns that are highly visible at night.

"...The [eastbound] optional route leaves the regular route at Clayton and McCausland avenues and continues north on Skinker boulevard to Lindell boulevard, east on Lindell boulevard to Whittier street, north on Whittier street to Delmar boulevard, east on Delmar boulevard to Grand boulevard, north on Grand boulevard to Natural Bridge avenue (3700 north), east on Natural Bridge Avenue to Salisbury street, northeast on Salisbury street to Ninth street and continuing on Ninth street to the McKinley Bridge to Venice, Ill., where the route enjoins the regular route in Venice.

"...The restricted part of the optional route is on Skinker and Lindell boulevards west of Kingshighway, so a different routing for commercial vehicles has been marked leaving the regular route at Clayton and Boyle avenues, north to Lindell boulevard, thence turning east with the remainder of the optional route."

1930. A McKinley Bridge Auto Trails Map from about 1930 shows Optional 66 as:

Entering St. Louis: At end of McKinley Bridge, L on 9th St.; next R on Salisbury St.; R on Natural Bridge Ave.; L on Grand Blvd. R on Delmar Blvd.; L on Whittier St.

To Joplin: From Whittier St., go west on Lindell Blvd.; L on Skinker Rd.; ahead on McCausland Ave.; R on Manchester Rd. (At the corner of McCausland, Clayton and Skinker, U.S. 66 joined Optional 66), or

To Joplin: From Whittier St., go west on Lindell Blvd.; L on Boyle Ave.; R on Clayton Ave. through Forest Park; L on McCausland Ave.; R on Manchester Rd. (At the corner Boyle and Clayton, U.S. 66 joined Optional 66.)

A McKinley Bridge Auto Trails Map from this period describes the eastbound routing as:

"Approaching St. Louis from the Southwest on Highway No. 66 known as the Springfield-Joplin route, follow U.S. 66 markers through Maplewood to the junction of McCausland Avenue, Clayton Avenue and Skinker Boulevard. These three streets converge at the Southwest corner of Forest Park.

"Tourists bound for Illinois Routes 3, 4 or 16 should leave the regular U.S. 66 route at this point and follow the "Optional U.S. 66" markers through the City direct to the McKinley Bridge. Another "Optional U.S. 66" route leading to the McKinley Bridge branches off the regular U.S. 66 route at Boyle Avenue (4300 Block West). Heavy downtown traffic and congestion avoided by these two "Optional" Routes. A savings of about four miles, and a half hours time is made by taking the McKinley Bridge route."

1931-1932. According to the AAA 1931 Transcontinental Tour Book and 1932 Hobbs Guide), Optional 66 was:

At end of the McKinley Bridge, L on 9th St.; next R on Salisbury St.; R on Natural Bridge Ave.; L on Vandeventer Ave. To Joplin: From Vandeventer Ave., R on Lindell Blvd., L on Skinker Rd., ahead on McCausland Ave., R on Manchester Rd.

In 1932, the Hobbs Guide and the Automobile Club of Southern California also show:

At end of the McKinley Bridge, L on 9th St.; next R on Salisbury St.; R on Natural Bridge Ave.; L on Vandeventer Ave. To Joplin: From Vandeventer, R on Lindell Blvd., L on Boyle Ave., R on Clayton Ave. into Oakland Ave. through Forest Park; L on McCausland Ave.; R on Manchester Rd.

The Hobbs Guide has the following description which confirms why Optional 66 was the preferred route -- "[From] Venice, Ill.; westbound keep straight ahead and follow Optional 66. Left here on Ill. No. 4 and U.S. 66 is via free bridge, 3.6 miles longer and more congested; heavy trucking..."

By August 1933, construction on New Watson Road in St. Louis and Franklin Counties was complete, and U.S. 66 and Optional 66 were rerouted away from Dogtown - but from November 1926 to August 1933, old U.S. 66 went through Dogtown.

NOTES:

1)   Official Road Map of Missouri, issued by the Missouri State Highway Commission - 1926 - 1934, inclusive.

2)   St. Louis Globe-Democrat (SLGD) -- October 17, 1926.

3)   Map of the United States System of Highways, approved by AASHTO on November 11, 1926.

4)   Report of Joint Board on Interstate Highways dated October 30, 1925; approved by The Secretary of Agriculture on November 18, 1925.

5)   List of roads approved for Federal numbers -- Addenda Number One, January 14, 1926, and Addenda Number Two, September 20, 1926.

6)   Correspondence from the National Archives provided by Richard Weingroff of the FHA.

7)   Volume VI, Number 2 of American Highways, published by AASHTO, April 1927. (the 1929 list of United States Numbered Highways published by AASHTO shows: "Missouri St. Louis 36, Pacific 51, Cuba 24, Rolla 58, Lebanon 63, Springfield 52, Carthage 17, Joplin 8.")

8)   AAA 1927 South Central and North Central Tour Books.

9)   On February 23, 1927, the Missouri Highway Commission formally confirms the U.S. routes in Missouri - such highways are: U.S. 24, 36, 40, 50, 54, 60, 61, 63, 65, 66, 67, 69 and 71. Route 66 is described as: "From St. Louis via Pacific, Cuba, Rolla, Lebanon, Springfield, Carthage, and Joplin to the Missouri-Kansas State line at Galena."

10)   MoDOT files -- St. Louis Metro District Office.

11)   Letter from Sam D. Hodgdon, President.

12)   SLGD - August 6, 1933 and St. Louis Post-Dispatch (SLPD) - August 5, 1933

13)   

AAA Missouri Motor News -- Vol. 1, No. 1, July 1929, and MoDOT minutes for July 2 and 9, 1929.

At the time, the primary state road system was approximately 1,500 miles. The amendment added 300 miles of roads to the primary system, and separately provided $11,500,000 for previously designated "traffic relief" roads in Kansas City and St. Louis.

The new primary roads had to be selected by MoDOT from approximately 1,700 miles requested from all sections of the state. The selection process, which included several public hearings, was concluded by MoDOT on July 2, 1929, at a special meeting in St. Louis.

The amendment specifically included two roads in the St. Louis area that would soon become U.S. 66:

"A road leaving U.S. 50 and 66 at or near Gray's [sic] Summit, thence into St. Louis over the Antire and Watson Roads." [Designated as U.S. 66 TR] "A road connecting the Chain of Rocks bridge with the preceding road [a road connecting the Alton bridge with Kingshighway], extending west and south through Bridgeton, connecting with the Denny road [Lindbergh Blvd.] near Pattonville, and intersecting all state roads leading from St. Louis, and stopping at U.S. 61 near Mehlville." [Designated as State Route 77] This amendment also made it unlawful for any state official or agency to divert highway revenues to other than highway purposes. Missouri became the first state to protect and earmark its highway revenues.

14)   

Minutes of the AASHTO Executive Committee -- October 3 and 6, 1927, June 1, 1928, November 11 and 14, 1928, June 3, 1929, November 14, 1929, May 26, 1930, November 16, 1930, June 8, 1931, September 28, 1931, June 22, 1932, November 14, 1932, April 25, 1933, October 9, 1933, June 22 and 23, 1934, and November 11, 1934.

15)

SLGD -- All the "letter" (A, B, etc.) streets in Granite City were renamed under an ordinance dated June 6, 1927; G St. was changed to Grand Avenue.

16)   

SLGD -- On July 12, 1927, the local court approved the paving of one mile of Broadway and Main St. in Venice, IL, the principal road to the McKinley Bridge on Illinois Routes 3 and 4 [U.S. 66]. The contract was let on July 27, 1927, at a cost of $107,039.

17)   

Minutes of the Madison County Board of Supervisors for 1927-1928, on file at the court House in Edwardsville, IL.

18)   Officially designated as Section 63, State Bond Issue Route 4.

19)

SLGD -- November 1, 1927 -- A delegation of officials from East St. Louis will confer with the Governor of Illinois "in regard to the completion of Routes Nos. 3 & 4 of the Illinois State Highway. At present there is an unfinished portion which makes it impossible to enter East St. Louis by the Ninth Street Subway and forces them to cross the Black Bridge over a route that is long and not paved its entire length."

SLGD -- December 4, 1927 -- "A 1.67 mile stretch of Route 4 just outside of Madison has remained uncompleted because Madison County failed to procure the right of way, as ordered by the state. This slight stretch is of unusual importance, however, as connecting Route 4 with Routes 3, 12, 13 and 15. ...The inhabitants of the near-by communities are cut off from ready access to East St. Louis by a temporary road leading across twelve railroad tracks, which is only used when unavoidable."

It is interesting that the state said: "No more roads will be built in Madison County until the coveted section is finished. [And the] Board of Supervisors ... responded figuratively, What of it?"

20)

SLGD -- March 16, 1928, the reasons given for the settlement were that: the state said: "No more roads will be built in Madison County until the road was constructed and the county election to be held on April 3, 1928, when a new Board would be selected.

Subsequent Madison County Board of Supervisors Minutes -- March 15, 1928 - Authorized the short section of SBI 3&4 as State Aid Routes - P. 239; May 11, 1928 - Resolution passed to acquire right of way for State Highways; October 11, 1928 - Section of SBI 3&4 approved by the State Highway Department -- letter dated September 12, 1928.

21)   IDOT project files -- Springfield, IL. (Cannot tell if completion date is June or August 1929.

22

For example, a Coronado Hotel (located at Lindell Blvd. and Spring Ave.) brochure/map from this period states:

"The Coronado is St. Louis' largest hotel and its finest. It contains 700 rooms and 700 baths. It enjoys the reputation of being one of the most beautiful hotels in the country. It is in the center of St. Louis life, and is favored by the better class of the traveling public."

"...the Coronado is on or near every main highway leading in or out of St. Louis. Federal-marked highways 50, 66, 61 and 40 pass its gates." And, "Streets shown in heavy lines are sign-posted for your convenience by the Automobile Club of Missouri."


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